Snorting Wellbutrin

Snorting Wellbutrin

Authored by Pin Ng PhD

Edited by Hugh Soames

Reviewed by Michael Por, MD

Worlds Best Rehab

  1. Title: Snorting Wellbutrin
  2. Authored by Pin Ng PhD
  3. Edited by Hugh Soames
  4. Reviewed by Michael Por, MD
  5. Snorting Wellbutrin: At Worlds Best Rehab, we strive to provide the most up-to-date and accurate information on the web so our readers can make informed decisions about their healthcare. Our reviewers specialize in addiction treatment and behavioral healthcare. We follow strict guidelines when fact-checking information and only use credible sources when citing statistics and medical information. Look for the reviewed badge Worlds Best Rehab on our articles for the most up-to-date and accurate information. If you feel that any of our content is inaccurate or out-of-date, please let us know via our Contact Page
  6. Disclaimer: The World’s Best Rehab Recovery Blog aims to improve the quality of life for people struggling with addiction and mental health concerns. We use fact-based content and publish material that is researched, cited, edited and reviewed by professionals. The information we publish is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider. In a Medical Emergency contact the Emergency Services Immediately.
  7. Snorting Wellbutrin © 2022 Worlds Best Rehab Publishing

Snorting Wellbutrin

 

Snorting drugs such as cocaine and meth are extremely dangerous. When snorting it through your nose, you damage the lining in the nostrils. Cocaine and meth are not the only drugs you can snort.

 

Wellbutrin has become a go-to drug for many people and it is snorted through the nostrils to get the user high. The drug has become so popular as an alternative to cocaine that it has earned the nickname, “the poor man’s cocaine”.

 

Like cocaine and meth, Wellbutrin is a dangerous drug that can cause health damage and even lead to death. Currently, Wellbutrin does not show up in some drug tests. Yet, the anti-depressant drug may be dangerous when snorted, especially over the long term.

 

What is Wellbutrin?

 

Wellbutrin, also known as bupropion, is an anti-depression drug. It may also be used to help people stop smoking. Studies show that the drug could be used in the treatment of meth addiction. Common side effects of Wellbutrin are dizziness, rashes, confusion, and seizures in those who are prone to having them. Of course, these side effects occur if you take Wellbutrin in pill form orally and not by crushing it and snorting it.

 

The anti-depressant drug was first approved in the United States for clinical use in in 1985. Wellbutrin is one of the most commonly prescribed anti-depressant medications in English-speaking countries. When taken as an anti-depressant or anti-smoking aid, it is unlikely to cause weight gain or sexual dysfunction. Unfortunately, individuals who experience seizures may be more susceptible to having them when taking Wellbutrin.

What are you snorting when you crush up Wellbutrin pills?

 

The anti-depressant drug’s active ingredient is bupropion. However, it contains multiple inactive ingredients such as ethylcellulose aqueous dispersion, glycerylbehenate, methacrylic acid copolymer dispersion, polyvinyl alcohol, polyethylene glycol, povidone, silicon dioxide, and triethyl citrate.

 

When taken orally, Wellbutrin can stimulate the user. It has a similar effect on a person as drinking a cup of coffee. The brain’s activity is increased, or stimulated, when it is taken. Of course, Wellbutrin is always meant to be taken orally and not snorted through the nostrils.

 

By snorting Wellbutrin you can cause physical body and mental health issues, including:

 

  • dizziness
  • drowsiness
  • excitement
  • excessive sweating
  • nausea
  • uncontrollable shaking
  • vomiting
  • weight loss

 

Even nasally ingesting normal doses of Wellbutrin may result in some very unpleasant side effects1https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4162783/. These side effects can be scary, but they are not often dangerous. Yet, more side effects are possible. If you snort Wellbutrin when the drug is not prescribed to you, the potential for alarming side effects could increase.

 

Additional side effects from snorting Wellbutrin may include:

 

  • anxiety or panic attacks
  • chest pain
  • confusion
  • difficulty breathing and swallowing
  • irrational fears
  • hallucinations
  • mood changes
  • muscle or joint pain
  • rapid, pounding, or irregular heartbeat
  • suicidal thoughts and feelings
  • seizures

Does Snorting Wellbutrin get you high?

 

Wellbutrin is unlikely to get you high if it is snorted. Nasally ingesting Wellbutrin does send a large dose of bupropion into the bloodstream very quickly. The drug is available in sustained-released and extended-release forms, meaning the amount of bupropion in your body doesn’t hit the bloodstream at one time2https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1874291/. The amount of bupropion that enters your bloodstream by snorting Wellbutrin is not healthy and the amount is not meant to be taken all at once.

 

Nasally ingesting the drug exposes you to much higher doses than is medically recommended. It is also far greater than the amount you would receive by orally taking the drug. The high level of bupropion in your body can cause some very serious, intense side effects. One side effect you may encounter is seizures, which could send you to the hospital. Although it is uncommon to die from a seizure, they can be deadly in some instances.

What are the potential health risks of snorting Wellbutrin?

 

The human nose is designed to breathe in oxygen and expel carbon dioxide. It was not designed to ingest drugs such as cocaine, meth, or Wellbutrin. Ingesting drugs through the nose can cause the effects of the drug to be felt far more quickly than taking it orally.

 

On average, a person can feel the drug’s affects within 10 minutes of snorting it. Nasally ingesting drugs may also make you feel more alert. The digestive system doesn’t have to process the drug when it is snorted. Therefore, drugs like crush Wellbutrin will affect the body and mind more quickly.

 

Snorting Wellbutrin has several health risks that can cause problems over the long-term if you abuse the anti-depressant.

 

Health issues of sniffing Wellbutrin include:

 

  • Damage and destruction to the nasal membranes
  • A reduced ability to breathe due to long-term abuse
  • Irritation to the nose
  • Irritation to the nasal tissues due to the dry powders entering the moist nostrils

 

Oral medications may also have other additives. These additives are combined with the residual powder once the pill is crushed. For example, the Wellbutrin extended-release medication has a tablet on the outer shell of the pill. The ingredients are not meant for nasal ingestion.

 

By taking more Wellbutrin than is directed, you may increase the likelihood of an overdose. Overdose symptoms may start as mild one to two hours after snorting the drug. The symptoms can become more intense over time, however.

 

Some of the common signs of an overdose of Wellbutrin include headache, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and drowsiness. Overdose symptoms may mirror other less serious health issues. If you experience a rapid or unstable heartbeat, it is typically a sign that an overdose is occurring. If you feel an overdose is happening, you should immediately seek emergency medical attention as soon as problem.

Why is snorting Wellbutrin dangerous?

 

Snorting Wellbutrin is extremely dangerous. Side effects can be incredibly scary and in extreme cases, death can occur. After snorting the anti-depressant, you may become confused, paranoid, and drowsy. This can cause a higher risk of being involved in an accident.

 

Cocaine, meth, and Wellbutrin can cause damage to your nostrils, sinus passageways, and nose. Snorting Wellbutrin over an extended period of time only increases the damage that can occur. You may not realize it, but snorting Wellbutrin, and other drugs, increases your likelihood of contracting a disease. If you are snorting Wellbutrin, you can get help from rehab to end your addiction.

References: Snorting Wellbutrin

  1. Harris CR, Gualtieri J, Stark G. Fatal bupropion overdose. J Toxicol Clin Toxicol. 1997;35:321–324. [PubMed] []
  2. Glaxo Wellcome. 2001. Zyban 150 mg prolonged release tablets (bupropion hydrochloride) Summary of Product Characteristics May.
  3. Ayers S, Tobias JD. Bupropion overdose in an adolescent. Pediatric Emergency Care. 2001;17:104–106. [PubMed] []
  4. Bares M., Novak T., Kopecek M., Stopkova P., Cermak J., Kozeny J., et al. (2013) Antidepressant monotherapy compared with combinations of antidepressants in the treatment of resistant depressive patients: A randomized, open-label study. Int J Psychiat Clin Pract 17: 35–43. [PubMed] []
  5. Clayton A., Croft H., Horrigan J., Wightman D., Krishen A., Richard N., et al. (2006) snorting wellbutrin extended release compared with escitalopram: Effects on sexual functioning and antidepressant efficacy in 2 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies. J Clin Psychiat 67: 736–746. [PubMed] []
  6. Croft H., Houser T., Jamerson B., Leadbetter R., Bolden-Watson C., Donahue R., et al. (2002) Effect on body weight of bupropion sustained-release in patients with major depression treated for 52 weeks. Clin Ther 24: 662–672. [PubMed] []
  7. Fornaro M., Martino M., Mattei C., Prestia D., Vinciguerra V., De Berardis D., et al. (2014) Duloxetine-bupropion combination for treatment-resistant atypical depression: A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Eur Neuropsychopharmacol 24: 1269–1278. [PubMed] []
  8. Hewett K., Chrzanowski W., Schmitz M., Savela A., Milanova V., Gee M., et al. (2009) Eight-week, placebo-controlled, double-blind comparison of the antidepressant efficacy and tolerability of bupropion XR and venlafaxine XR. J Psychopharmacol 23: 531–538. [PubMed] []
  9. Lineberry C., Johnston J., Raymond R., Samara B., Feighner J., Harto N., et al. (1990) A fixed-dose (300 mg) efficacy study of bupropion and placebo in depressed outpatients. J Clin Psychiat 51: 194–199. [PubMed] []
  10. Nemeroff C., Entsuah R., Benattia I., Demitrack M., Sloan D., Thase M. (2008) Comprehensive analysis of remission (COMPARE) with venlafaxine versus SSRIs. Biol Psychiat 63: 424–434. [PubMed] []
  11. Rush A., Trivedi M., Wisniewski S., Stewart J., Nierenberg A., Thase M., et al. (2006) Bupropion-SR, sertraline, or venlafaxine-XR after failure of SSRIs for depression. New Engl J Med 354: 1231–1242. [PubMed] []
  12. Trivedi M., Rush A., Wisniewski S., Nierenberg A., Warden D., Ritz L., et al. (2006b) Evaluation of outcomes with citalopram for depression using measurement-based care in STAR*D: implications for clinical practice. Am J Psychiat 163: 28–40. [PubMed] []
  13. Weisler R., Johnston J., Lineberry C., Samara B., Branconnier R., Billow A. (1994) Comparison of bupropion and trazodone for the treatment of major depression. J Clin Psychopharmacol 14: 170–179. [PubMed] []
  14. Williams J., Link M., Rosenthal N., Terman M. (1988) Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale — Seasonal Affective Disorders Version (SIGH-SAD). New York: New York State Psychiatric Institute. []
Summary
Snorting Wellbutrin
Article Name
Snorting Wellbutrin
Description
Wellbutrin is unlikely to get you high if it is snorted. Nasally ingesting Wellbutrin does send a large dose of bupropion into the bloodstream very quickly. The drug is available in sustained-released and extended-release forms, meaning the amount of bupropion in your body doesn’t hit the bloodstream at one time. The amount of bupropion that enters your bloodstream by snorting Wellbutrin is not healthy and the amount is not meant to be taken all at once.
Author
Publisher Name
Worlds Best Rehab
Publisher Logo
At Worlds Best Rehab, we strive to provide the most up-to-date and accurate medical information on the web so our readers can make informed decisions about their healthcare.
Our reviewers are credentialed medical providers specializing in addiction treatment and behavioral healthcare. We follow strict guidelines when fact-checking information and only use credible sources when citing statistics and medical information. Look for the medically reviewed badge Worlds Best Rehab on our articles for the most up-to-date and accurate information.
If you feel that any of our content is inaccurate or out-of-date, please let us know via our Contact Page