Rapid Detox

Authored by Helen Parson

Edited by Alexander Bentley

Reviewed by Philippa Gold

Understanding Rapid Detox

 

Rapid detox is a controversial topic and one that is unlikely to be accepted by everyone for its positive uses. It is a concept that has helped individuals addicted to drugs kick the habit and gain the help they need to live a healthier lifestyle11.H. Ziaaddini, A. Qahestani and M. M. Vaziri, Comparing Symptoms of Withdrawal, Rapid Detoxi-fication and Detoxification with Clonidine in Drug Dependent Patients – PMC, PubMed Central (PMC).; Retrieved September 29, 2022, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3905486/.

 

A patient undergoing a rapid detox treatment program is put under anesthesia for up to six hours. During this time, an opioid antagonist drug such as naltrexone is used to remove the opioid drugs from the patient’s body. Drugs such as heroin and prescription pain medication can removed from the body during fast detox22.A. M. Diaper, F. D. Law and J. K. Melichar, Pharmacological strategies for detoxification – PMC, PubMed Central (PMC).; Retrieved September 29, 2022, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4014033/.

 

The detox method is used to stop a patient from feeling the devastating effects of withdrawal. Sedating the patient and putting them under anesthesia allows them to “sleep” through the withdrawal and detox process. The hope is that after the fast detox process, the patient will wake up with their body completely clean of drugs. The remainder of the withdrawal process will be minimal enabling the person to get on with the rehab process. Throughout rapid detox, the patient is monitored to ensure safety.

 

Ultra Fast Detox

 

During an ultra rapid detoxification (UROD), the opiate detoxification is induced by the use of massive injected doses of Naloxone under heavy sedation. This is followed by a lower and slower set of injections of low-dose Naloxone33.J. J. Legarda, Ultra-rapid opiate detoxification under anaesthesia (UROD) – The Lancet, The Lancet.; Retrieved September 29, 2022, from https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(05)78915-7/fulltext.

 

An Ultra Rapid Detoxification usually takes between 4 to 6 hours and is exclusively carried out in an intensive care unit. After an Ultra Fast detox an individual usually requires around two days of in patient observation and switch to a more steady treatment protocol. Research in the Lancet44.J. J. Legarda, Ultra-rapid opiate detoxification under anaesthesia (UROD) – The Lancet, The Lancet.; Retrieved September 29, 2022, from https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(05)78915-7/fulltext suggests that:

 

  • complete detoxification is attained
  • an individual experiences no withdrawal symptoms
  • physical dependency is eliminated
  • psychological cravings are reduced

 

Is Rapid Detox Safe?

 

Experts claim that rapid detox is a safe way to cleanse the body. It is also more pleasant as individuals who go through opioid withdrawal can experience shakes, sweats, nausea, and other issues for long periods.

 

Opioid withdrawal can take weeks to fully complete. However, rapid detox can take only three days. While the process of undergoing anesthesia is just a few hours, patients can be kept in a medical clinic for monitoring afterwards. The process enables a patient to get the most difficult and frightening part of rehab out of the way. Once completed, patients can focus on the mental and emotional side of recovery.

 

Does Rapid Detox Work?

 

Rapidly delivered detox cannot be used as a substitute for addiction. It is a process that aids and enables a person to go through recovery. However, fast detox is not a process for recovery alone. It is merely a way for the body to be cleansed, so patients can move onto rehab.

 

The medical field is torn over whether this method of fast detox works. For most opioid addicts, the biggest barrier of attending rehab and recovering from addiction is withdrawal. The pain and distress cold turkey withdrawal can have on a person can drive them back to opioid use. Therefore, limiting or stopping a person’s physical symptoms allowing them to focus on making a full recovery via rehab should be praised.

 

Fast Detox Price

 

Depending on the course of treatment, this procedure costs thousands or tens of thousands of dollars. The process is done in the hospital and, because sedation and intensive monitoring is involved, the costs add up. Insurance companies usually won’t cover this treatment because it is not considered to be medically necessary.

 

Rapid detox at home

 

Fast detox at home is not recommended under any circumstances. Any detox and withdrawal from drugs and alcohol has a significant risk which should not be underestimated. Any detox should be undertaken with medical supervision and only after consultation with a physician. A rapid detox involves sedation and must only be carried out in an intensive care unit. Do not attempt a rapid detox at home.

 

Rapid detox in Canada

 

Rapidly Delivered Detox in Canada is slightly different to Rapid Detox in the United States as it follows different medical protocols,. In Canada the initial massive dose of Naloxone is reduced, and so is the amount of time the rapid detox will take. In Canada a Rapid Detox will take around 5 days fro start to finish.

 

The Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health guidelines on Rapid and Ultra Rapid detoxification do caution against fast Detox in Canada due to the associated risks. This is is why Raid Detox should only be undertaken with strict medical supervision.

 

In Canada there are only a few treatment centers and medical professionals offering Rapid Detox programs although the number of Canadians seeking our Rapidly Delivered Detox are growing month on month, with many heading over the border to the United States for treatment in California.

 

Rapid detox center in Florida

 

Many Luxury Rehabs in Florida offer fast detox with prices between $15,000 and $85,000. Rapid detox centers in Florida can mainly be found in Miami and Tampa. Both areas that are highly regarded in the United States for their professionalism and progressive outlook on treatment.

 

Risks of Rapid Detox

 

Physical withdrawal can always feel unbearable, although the general consensus is that a normal detox protocols are not life threatening in all but the most serious of cases. However, rapidly occurring detox is an even more complex medical process and patients can experience adverse reactions to the medications. The risks of rapid detox should not be underestimated and may lead to death

What happens after fast detox?

 

Many critics claim rapid detox occurs too quickly or that it doesn’t provide sustained recovery. What these critics fail to understand is that the treatment is just the first step in the rehab process. A person must follow up their detox treatment with rehab to address their mental, behavioral, and emotional problems.

 

By completing a residential rehab program following detox, individuals can fully recover from their opioid addiction. Withdrawal isn’t a pleasant experience and offering patients the chance to lessen their distressing physical and mental feelings can improve one’s chances of recovery.

 

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  • 1
    1.H. Ziaaddini, A. Qahestani and M. M. Vaziri, Comparing Symptoms of Withdrawal, Rapid Detoxi-fication and Detoxification with Clonidine in Drug Dependent Patients – PMC, PubMed Central (PMC).; Retrieved September 29, 2022, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3905486/
  • 2
    2.A. M. Diaper, F. D. Law and J. K. Melichar, Pharmacological strategies for detoxification – PMC, PubMed Central (PMC).; Retrieved September 29, 2022, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4014033/
  • 3
    3.J. J. Legarda, Ultra-rapid opiate detoxification under anaesthesia (UROD) – The Lancet, The Lancet.; Retrieved September 29, 2022, from https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(05)78915-7/fulltext
  • 4
    4.J. J. Legarda, Ultra-rapid opiate detoxification under anaesthesia (UROD) – The Lancet, The Lancet.; Retrieved September 29, 2022, from https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(05)78915-7/fulltext
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