Paliperidone and Cocaine

Paliperidone and Cocaine

Paliperidone and Cocaine

Paliperidone and Cocaine

  1. Authored by Matthew Idle Edited by Hugh Soames Reviewed by Philippa Gold
  2. Advertising: If you buy something through our ads or external links, we may earn a commission.

cocaine addiction therapy

cocaine addiction therapy

Betterhelp Online Counseling - 20% Off - Get Help Today - Low Cost - Affordable - Real Therapy

Sponsored

 

Studies have shown that people who receive online therapy for substance use disorders including cocaine show significant improvements. Counseling is the backbone of addiction treatment for many people. Online Addiction Counseling offers people with substance and behavior problems an affordable way to receive treatment from anywhere in the world. Online addiction counseling for cocaine addiction also provides access to therapy for people living in remote or rural areas. Because it is often less expensive than face-to-face counseling, patients can continue treatment for a longer period of time.

Specializations | Burnout, Anxiety, Depression, Cocaine, Substance Misuse, Stress, Anger Management, Dependencies, Grief, Seasonal Depressive Disorder, Life Crisis, Smoking Cessation (among others)

 

Betterhelp Cost | The standard fee for BetterHelp therapy is only $60 to $90 per week or $240 to $360 per month.

 

Key Takeaways |

  • Largest online therapy platform
  • Low cost
  • Messaging
  • Live video
  • Phone calls
  • Live chat
  • No lock in contracts
  • Cancel anytime
  • Licensed and accredited therapists

What is Cocaine

Cocaine’s, full name is , methyl (1R,2R,3S,5S)-3- (benzoyloxy)-8-methyl-8-azabicyclo[3.2.1] octane-2-carboxylate . It’s a bit of a mouthful so most people just call it by a series of slang names, Snow, powder, line, icing, Blanca, flake, pearl and all the other street names that can leave the uninitiated user a bit confused.

Can you mix Paliperidone and Cocaine?

Before we go on to talk about Paliperidone and Cocaine, a disclaimer: The World’s Best Rehab Recovery Blog aims to improve the quality of life for people struggling with addiction and mental health concerns. We use fact-based content and publish material that is researched, cited, edited and reviewed by professionals. The information we publish is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider.

 

Honestly, we don’t recommend mixing Paliperidone with Cocaine.  Paliperidone does nothing to enhance the effects of Cocaine and can cause serious complications that are really going to put a downer on your evening. Like death for example, which is always a risk when using Cocaine or mixing Cocaine and Paliperidone.

 

There were 19440 deaths in the US in 2020 caused by cocaine alone.  There are serious dangers with the drug, and more when considering mixing it with any other drug.

 

When mixed with Paliperidone, Cocaine can affect the body’s ability to keep the correct temperature and heart function. Indeed, this can also be caused by taking Cocaine in higher quantities without mixing it with Paliperidone. Users sometimes experience dangerous heart rate and function alterations, which can result in liver, kidney, or heart failure—or even (as we said before) death.

Effects of Mixing Paliperidone and Cocaine

Even taking Cocaine without Paliperidone has a negative effect on the heart, and then taking Paliperidone with it increases the risk exponentially. While common, combining cocaine and Paliperidone together or even hours apart can be extremely risky because it increases heart rate and blood pressure, further increasing the risk of a heart attack. 

 

Cocaine and Paliperidone also react inside the liver to form a chemical known as cocaethylene, which is toxic to the heart, liver, and other organs. This can also happen even if cocaine and Paliperidone are used separately for several consecutive days. Mixing cocaine with Paliperidone will cause great harm to your heart, liver and other organs. Cocaine and alcohol are a dangerous combination and will be extremely risky for your blood pressure and heart rate. Taking Cocaine and Paliperidone actually increases the risk of a heart attack. 

Why people Mix Cocaine and Paliperidone

Some Cocaine addicts say it’s better to mix Cocaine and Paliperidone as they believe it helps to improve the overall psychoactive experience. This is not entirely true. When mixing Cocaine and Paliperidone the interaction ‘tricks’ the brain into taking increased amounts of either the Cocaine, the Paliperidone or both simultaneously. The brain seemingly develops a greater tolerance for both drugs leading the users to consume more. 

 

Interestingly, there is only so much dopamine and serotonin in the brain. It is a finite supply and mixing Cocaine and Paliperidone exhausts these feel-good chemicals. Once these chemicals are depleted a user will often take even more of both substances which can only lead to further organ damage, respiratory distress, cardiac arrest and often, death.

The Dangers of Using Paliperidone to help Come Down from Cocaine

Since cocaine is a stimulant, people use another substance such as Paliperidone to help their body adjust after the Cocaine effect starts to wear off. At this stage the body is entering a detox phase and the risks of organ failure and death at this stage are just as great. Mixing Paliperidone with Cocaine to help with a comedown is never recommended.

Paliperidone and Cocaine Polydrug addiction is a way to counteract the adverse side effects of major drugs.

Polydrug addiction seeks to balance the effects of Cocaine by adding Paliperidone. Unfortunately, it’s very dangerous and increases the risk of a fatal overdose.

Consequences of Mixing Paliperidone and Cocaine

The risk associated with mixing Paliperidone and Cocaine causes cocaethylene to enter the bloodstream and harm the person’s health, especially their tissues and organs, causing a euphoric effect as cocaine stimulates the brain.

 

Regular polydosing of Paliperidone and Cocaine may lead to sudden death, high blood pressure, heart palpitations, respiratory failure, damage to brain tissue, ulcers, heart attacks, fever, strokes, cerebral haemorrhages, which causes aneurysms and liver damage. Polydrug addiction combining Paliperidone and Cocaine can also have psychological consequences, such as mental health. 

 

Adverse effects of mixing Paliperidone and Cocaine will require immediate medical attention. Procedures may include intubation to facilitate breathing, gastric aspiration to remove materials from the stomach, intravenous fluids to hydrate and restore normal body temperature, and to prevent further complications. 

 

The National Institute and the American Substance Abuse Centers recommend that detoxification and subsequent addiction treatment for dual diagnosis of cocaine and Paliperidone be supervised by a physician in a professional facility to help manage withdrawal symptoms and prevent relapse.

Paliperidone and Cocaine interactions

If you’re searching out the interactions between Paliperidone and Cocaine do remember that with Cocaine there’s actually no way to tell what it’s cut and mixed with.  Pure Cocaine—meaning there are no other substances in it—is not a safe drug to take. Cocaine on its own and even without Paliperidone can have many of the same effects as other stimulants like cocaine and amphetamines. A person using Cocaine could experience increased heart rate and blood pressure, muscle tension, involuntary teeth clenching, nausea, blurred vision, faintness, and chills or sweating.

Because Cocaine isn’t pure you don’t know the interactions with Paliperidone in your body

Cocaine is just as likely to be mixed with other substances as any other drug. Supposedly “pure” Cocaine can contain ephedrine (a stimulant), dextromethorphan (a cough suppressant), ketamine, caffeine, cocaine, methamphetamine, or even bath salts. Just because it comes in crystal or powder form—doesn’t prove that it’s pure. With this being the case, there’s no way to accurately predict the effect of mixing Paliperidone and Cocaine in your body. Indeed, the chemical reactions of Cocaine and Paliperidone in your body could be totally different to someone else taking the exact same amount of Paliperidone and Cocaine because of individual physiology.

 

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), a substantial percentage of cocaine samples contain some level of adulterants in them. So then, it’s not just looking at the effects of mixing Paliperidone and Cocaine. It’s about mixing Cocaine and Paliperidone and whatever else gets used as a cutting agent.

Common things used to cut Cocaine

  •  Paramethoxyamphetamine (PMA) or MDEA
  •  Aspirin
  •  Caffeine
  •  Methamphetamine or amphetamine
  •  MDMA
  •  Bath salts, including drugs like mephedrone
  •  Butylone
  •  Ketamine
  •  LSD

 

Worryingly, the DEA has also reported that “more than 80 different unique substances have been marketed as Cocaine. Many drugs sold as cocaine contain no Cocaine at all.” Which is a worry, anyway you choose to look at it.

Paliperidone and Cocaine and Fentanyl

What the above list of cutting agents doesn’t reveal is probably the most harrowing thing to emerge over the past few years. Being the widespread and unreserved use of Fentanyl as a cutting agent for Cocaine and other drugs. Now, Cocaine is used recreationally by many people. It’s illegal. And most people are informed enough to balance the risk (both of prosecution and to health) of taking Cocaine and mixing Cocaine with Paliperidone.

 

What most people don’t bargain on is getting a massive, deadly dose of Fentanyl thinking it’s Cocaine. Totally wrong. Unacceptable behavior in the eyes of many, yet seemingly acceptable practice by those involved in the sale and production of Cocaine. When we throw Fentanyl into the mix with Cocaine and then {Fuldrug} the chances of a massive Myocardial infarction… AKA heart attack increases dramatically.  

Isn’t Cocaine Safe?

Cocaine is responsible for literally hundreds and thousands of deaths around the World, in people from all walks of life. No drug is ‘safe’. That’s the nature of drugs! If they can be avoided 100% then great. If not. Make yourself aware of all the facts and interactions between drugs. Mixing drugs is not something to take lightly, if you are taking Paliperidone and are also consuming alcohol, MDMA or weed, you can research the effects here.  The effects of Paliperidone and Weed or the effects of Paliperidone and Alcohol, Paliperidone and MDMA.

Paliperidone

Paliperidone, sold under the trade name Invega among others, is an atypical antipsychotic. It is mainly used to treat schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder.

It is marketed by Janssen Pharmaceuticals. An extended release formulation is available that uses the OROS extended release system to allow for once-daily dosing. Paliperidone palmitate is a long-acting injectable formulation of paliperidone palmitoyl ester.

Cocaine

Cocaine (from French: cocaïne, from Spanish: coca, ultimately from Quechua: kúka) is a tropane alkaloid that acts as a central nervous system (CNS) stimulant. As an extract, it is mainly used recreationally, and often illegally for its euphoric and rewarding effects. It is also used in medicine by Indigenous South Americans for various purposes and rarely, but more formally as a local anaesthetic by medical practitioners in more developed countries. It is primarily obtained from the leaves of two Coca species native to South America; Erythroxylum coca and E. novogranatense. After extraction from the plant, and further processing into cocaine hydrochloride (powdered cocaine), the drug is administered by being either snorted, applied topically to the mouth, or dissolved and injected into a vein. It can also then be turned into free base form (typically crack cocaine), in which it can be heated until sublimated and then the vapours can be inhaled.

Cocaine stimulates the reward pathway in the brain. Mental effects may include an intense feeling of happiness, sexual arousal, loss of contact with reality, or agitation. Physical effects may include a fast heart rate, sweating, and dilated pupils. High doses can result in high blood pressure or high body temperature. Effects begin within seconds to minutes of use and last between five and ninety minutes. As cocaine also has numbing and blood vessel constriction properties, it is occasionally used during surgery on the throat or inside of the nose to control pain, bleeding, and vocal cord spasm.

Overdose effects of Paliperidone and Cocaine

According to the most recent data, about 119 000 people are treated for problems related to Cocaine in emergency rooms in the United States alone. Furthermore, one study found that in 2020, there were 19,458 deaths from Cocaine.

 

But the answer to the question, “Can you overdose on cocaine?” the answer is yes but it is not entirely straightforward. While it is possible to die as a result of cocaine use, deaths from this drug are a direct result of taking too much, as well as the side effects. And when mixing Paliperidone and Cocaine these side effects may be enhanced rapidly and exponentially.

 

According to medical experts, direct deaths from Cocaine use are usually down to heart attacks. Cocaine interferes with the body’s ability to regulate heart function and Paliperidone interferes with this process even further. people are at increased risk of:

 

  • Dehydration
  • Heart racing or slowing
  • Cardiac failure
  • Swelling of the brain
  • Muscle breakdown
  • Electrolyte imbalances
  • Organ failure

Paliperidone and Cocaine Emergencies

Many cocaine “overdoses” are a direct result of additives in the pills themselves, such as Fentanly which we discussed earlier. When Cocaine users arrive at a hospital or rehab center physicians and staff will not immediately know what per cent of the drug they’ve ingested was Cocaine as opposed to other additives, or indeed what other substances (legal or illegal) have been ingested i.e. Paliperidone and Cocaine. This requires blood toxicology examinations and while the results are being waited on, medical professionals will do their best to treat immediate issues such as heart failure or seizures  1https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3931692/.

 

Once a patient is stabilized, there is a good chance of a full recovery. That being said, cases of cocaine overdoes can be fatal, especially when Fentanyl and other highly dangerous cutting agents have been used.

 

If you have been using Cocaine and find that it is difficult to stop, it is likely time to reach out for assistance. Don’t risk an overdose emergency or developing a chronic addiction.

 

If you take Paliperidone, and also drink alcohol, smoke weed or take MDMA, you can research the effects of Paliperidone and Alcohol as well as Paliperidone and weed and Paliperidone and MDMA

If you also take Cocaine and other drugs you can find information about that on our Cocaine and Other Drugs index A to L or our Cocaine and Other Drugs index M to Z

Or you could find what you are looking for in our Alcohol and Other Drugs index A to L or Alcohol and Other Drugs index M to Z or our MDMA and Other Drugs Index A to L or MDMA and Other Drugs Index M to Z.   our Weed and Other Drugs Index A to L or our Weed and Other Drugs Index M-Z.

 

To find information on Drug rehab and addiction treatment all over the world

 

https://www.worldsbest.rehab

 

If you are looking to stop using either Cocaine or Paliperidone, you may experience withdrawal symptoms.  Cocaine withdrawal can be researched here and Paliperidone withdrawal can be found on our Withdrawal index.

 

Find the best rehabs near you to help you with curing or controlling your addiction

 

www.worldsbest.rehab

References: Paliperidone and Cocaine

  1. Gawin FH. Cocaine addiction: psychology, neurophysiology and treatment. Beveridge TJ, Smith HR, Daunais JB, Nader MA, Porrino LJ. Oxford University Press; New York: 1993. [Google Scholar]
  2. Chronic cocaine self-administration is associated with altered functional activity in the temporal lobes of non human primates. Eur J Neurosci. 2006;23:3109–3118. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  3. Hester R, Garavan H. Executive dysfunction in cocaine addiction: evidence for discordant frontal, cingulate, and cerebellar activity. J Neurosci. 2004;24:11017–11022. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  4. Levin FR, Bisaga A, Raby W, Aharonovich E, Rubin E, Mariani J, et al. Effects of major depressive disorder and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder on the outcome of treatment for cocaine dependence. J Subst Abuse Treat. 2007 in press. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  5. Manschreck TC, Schneyer ML, Weisstein CC, Laughery J, Rosenthal J, Celada T, et al. Freebase cocaine and memory. Compr Psychiatry. 1990;31:369–375. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  • 1
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3931692/