Oxycodone and Oxycontin

Oxycodone and Oxycontin

Authored by Pin Ng PhD

Edited by Hugh Soames

Reviewed by Michael Por, MD

Worlds Best Rehab

  1. Title: Oxycodone and Oxycontin
  2. Authored by Pin Ng PhD
  3. Edited by Hugh Soames
  4. Reviewed by Michael Por, MD
  5. Oxycodone and Oxycontin: At Worlds Best Rehab, we strive to provide the most up-to-date and accurate information on the web so our readers can make informed decisions about their healthcare. Our reviewers specialize in addiction treatment and behavioral healthcare. We follow strict guidelines when fact-checking information and only use credible sources when citing statistics and medical information. Look for the reviewed badge Worlds Best Rehab on our articles for the most up-to-date and accurate information. If you feel that any of our content is inaccurate or out-of-date, please let us know via our Contact Page
  6. Disclaimer: The World’s Best Rehab Recovery Blog aims to improve the quality of life for people struggling with addiction and mental health concerns. We use fact-based content and publish material that is researched, cited, edited and reviewed by professionals. The information we publish is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider. In a Medical Emergency contact the Emergency Services Immediately.
  7. Oxycodone and Oxycontin © 2022 Worlds Best Rehab Publishing

Difference between Oxycontin and Oxycodone?

 

Oxycodone and Oxycontin are two very dangerous drugs. Both come from the opioid family and the pair are extremely addictive to individuals.

 

For the most part, oxycontin and oxycodone are the same drug. However, the main difference between them is that oxycontin is the long-acting form of oxycodone.

 

What is oxycontin and oxycodone used for?

 

When taken by a user, oxycontin releases oxycodone at a slow pace for over 12 hours. It needs to be taken just twice a day.

 

In comparison, oxycodone is a short-acting drug. It relieves pain for around four to six hours. It only needs to be taken four to six times per day to offer you all-day pain relief. Doctors usually prescribe oxycodone typically for acute pain. You may receive it post-surgery or after a trauma.

 

Oxycontin, on the other hand, is typically prescribed for long-term, chronic pain. Cancer sufferers may be prescribed oxycontin by their doctors. You should only take oxycontin for chronic severe pain that the drug has already proven to help.

 

Oxycontin is often known as a controlled-release or extended-release tablet due to it relieving pain over a long period. It was designed to allow the active drug, oxycodone, to be released in two phases. The first phase allows for a rapid release of oxycodone from the surface of the pill. This provides pain relief around 20 minutes after taking it. The inner layer of the tablet then slowly releases the rest of the oxycodone over the course of the next 12 hours.

 

Doctors and patients should not take a prescription of oxycontin and oxycodone lightly. These medications are opioids and create long-term addiction when abused. Even when a person has been prescribed the drugs legally, users may become addicted to them.

Oxycontin and oxycodone addiction

 

Oxycontin and oxycodone are dangerous drugs and you can become addicted to them. The drugs impact the brain and creates an addiction. Addiction is a disease that affects the nervous system. Opioids release chemicals creating pleasure in the brain.

 

Once the brain becomes used to the power of the opioid dose you consume, your brain wants larger doses to achieve a pleasurable feeling. Addiction occurs in this way and the more opioids you consume, the deadlier the drug is.

 

In theory, oxycontin should be less abused as an opioid drug. Since it is a time-release medication, it would make sense that addiction would not occur. However, this is not the case. Many users crush up the pills. Then, they consume them in various ways not intended by drug makers, which eliminates the time-released aspect of the medication. This sends a large, heavy dose of oxycontin into the body very quickly for a high.

Oxycontin is a deadly drug

 

It is believed that oxycontin is the United States’s most abused prescription opioid. In the past, doctors have been more than willing to prescribe the dangerous medication. It is not only available through prescription, but it is sold as a street drug.

 

Oxycontin is one of the drugs driving the opioid epidemic in the US. It is often used in place of heroin when it is crushed and snorted. It creates a high similar to heroin and as both drugs come from the opioid family1https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4018705/.

 

Not only is oxycontin addictive, but snorting it can cause a variety of nasal issues. The nose was not designed to snort dry powder. In addition, snorting a drug allows it to bypass the digestive system. It then enters the blood at a quicker rate, causing you to become high faster.

 

What are the side effects of oxycodone and oxycontin?

 

Since oxycodone and oxycontin have the same active ingredient, the drugs possess similar side effects. Side effects include:

 

  • Addiction and dependence
  • Constipation
  • Dizziness
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Abnormal dreams
  • Drowsiness
  • Dry mouth
  • Flushing
  • Headache
  • Itching skin
  • Low blood pressure and an increase risk of falling
  • Low energy and fatigue
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Red eyes
  • Respiratory depression causing slow and ineffective breathing
  • Sweating
  • Potential risk of seizures in people prone to seizures

Oxycontin and oxycodone can cause death

 

You may suffer respiratory depression during the first one to three days of taking the drugs, after an increase in dosage, or if you take too much oxycodone or oxycontin. You are more at risk of respiratory depression if you are elderly, frail, a child, or have a pre-existing respiratory condition. Respiratory depression may be deadly.

 

If you stop taking oxycodone or oxycontin suddenly after taking it for a period of time, you may experience withdrawal.

 

The symptoms of opioid withdrawal include:

 

  • Restlessness
  • Pupil dilation
  • Watery eyes
  • Runny nose
  • Sweating
  • Muscle ache
  • Insomnia
  • Irritability
  • Gastrointestinal issues including abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea

 

Can you take oxycontin and oxycodone with other medication?

 

Not only are oxycontin and oxycodone dangerous, addictive drugs, but they should not be taken with some other medications2https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2622774/. Mixing oxycontin and oxycodone with other drugs can cause death. Drugs you should not mix with oxycontin and oxycodone include:

 

  • Additional pain relief drugs
  • Alcohol
  • Sleeping pills
  • Tranquilizers
  • Skeletal muscle relaxers
  • Some antibiotics
  • Some antifungal drugs
  • Heart medication
  • Seizure drugs
  • HIV drugs
  • Medication for mental health disorders

 

In addition, women who are pregnant should not take either oxycontin or oxycodone. Their babies may be born addicted to opioid pain medication. Babies born addicted to opioids has been a part of the current opioid epidemic in America. Finally, if you are an asthma sufferer, you should not take either oxycontin or oxycodone.

Getting help for opioid medication addiction

 

America is currently dealing with an opioid epidemic. So far, it has impacted hundreds of thousands of individuals in the country. It doesn’t just affect the users, but the families of those people too.

 

Around 21% to 29% of patients in the US that are prescribed opioid pain medication misuse it. Up to 12% of people prescribed opioids for long-term, chronic pain develop an addiction to it.

 

Addiction to opioid medication is no laughing matter. Oxycontin and oxycodone that has been prescribed to patients have become a gateway drug to other, more harmful street drugs. The good news is, there is help out there. Residential rehab facilities are available. These centers help end a resident’s dependency on opioid pain medication by treating the underlaying issues that caused it.

References: Oxycontin and Oxycodone

  1. General Accounting Office (GAO). Prescription drugs oxycontin abuse and diversion and efforts to address the problem. Washington, DC: U.S: 2003. pp. 04–110. []
  2. King SJ, Reid C, Forbes K, Hanks G. A systematic review of oxycodone in the management of cancer pain. Palliat Med. 2011;25(5):454–70. doi: 10.1177/0269216311401948. [PubMed] [CrossRef] []
  3. Friedmann N, Klutzaritz V, Webster L. Efficacy and safety of an extended-release oxycodone (Remoxy) formulation in patients with moderate to severe osteoarthritic pain. J Opioid Manag. 2011;7(3):193–202. [PubMed] []
  4. Gatti A, Longo G, Sabato E, Sabato AF. Long-term controlled-release oxycodone and pregabalin in the treatment of non-cancer pain: an observational study. Eur Neurol. 2011;65(6):317–22. doi: 10.1159/000323424. [PubMed] []
Summary
Oxycontin and Oxycodone
Article Name
Oxycontin and Oxycodone
Description
Oxycodone and Oxycontin are two very dangerous drugs. Both come from the opioid family and the pair are extremely addictive to individuals. For the most part, oxycontin and oxycodone are the same drug. However, the main difference between them is that oxycontin is the long-acting form of oxycodone.
Author
Publisher Name
Worlds Best Rehab
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At Worlds Best Rehab, we strive to provide the most up-to-date and accurate medical information on the web so our readers can make informed decisions about their healthcare.
Our reviewers are credentialed medical providers specializing in addiction treatment and behavioral healthcare. We follow strict guidelines when fact-checking information and only use credible sources when citing statistics and medical information. Look for the medically reviewed badge Worlds Best Rehab on our articles for the most up-to-date and accurate information.
If you feel that any of our content is inaccurate or out-of-date, please let us know via our Contact Page