fluvoxamine and MDMA

{Fulldrug} and MDMA

fluvoxamine and MDMA

  1. Title: fluvoxamine and MDMA
  2. Authored by Philippa Gold
  3. Edited by Hugh Soames
  4. Reviewed by Dr. Ruth Arenas
  5. fluvoxamine and MDMA: At Worlds Best Rehab, we strive to provide the most up-to-date and accurate medical information on the web so our readers can make informed decisions about their healthcare. Our subject matter experts are specialize in addiction treatment and behavioral healthcare. We follow strict guidelines when fact-checking information and only use credible sources when citing statistics and medical information. Look for the badge Worlds Best Rehab on our articles for the most up-to-date and accurate information. If you feel that any of our content is inaccurate or out-of-date, please let us know via our Contact Page
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MDMA, full name methylenedioxy-methylamphetamine. Bit of a mouthful so most people just call it MDMA, Ecstasy, Molly, Mum and Dad, X, E, or XTC, Disco Biscuits, Thizz and all the other street names that can leave the uninitiated user a bit confused.

 

Can you can mix fluvoxamine and MDMA?

 

Before we go on to talk about fluvoxamine and MDMA, a disclaimer: The World’s Best Rehab Recovery Blog aims to improve the quality of life for people struggling with addiction and mental health concerns. We use fact-based content and publish material that is researched, cited, edited and reviewed by professionals. The information we publish is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider.

 

Honestly, we don’t recommend mixing fluvoxamine with MDMA. If you’re using it recreationally why bother? fluvoxamine does nothing to enhance the effects of MDMA and can cause serious complications that are really going to put a downer on your evening. Like death for example, which is always a risk when mixing MDMA and fluvoxamine.

 

When mixed with fluvoxamine, MDMA can affect the body’s ability to keep the correct temperature. Indeed, this can also be caused by taking MDMA in higher quantities without mixing it with fluvoxamine. Users sometimes experience a dangerous rise in body temperature (hyperthermia), which can result in liver, kidney, or heart failure—or even (as we said before) death.

 

fluvoxamine and MDMA interactions

 

If you’re searching out the interactions between fluvoxamine and MDMA do remember that with MDMA there’s actually no way to tell what it’s cut and mixed with.  Pure MDMA—meaning there are no other substances in it—is not a safe drug to take. MDMA on its own and even without fluvoxamine can have many of the same effects as other stimulants like cocaine and amphetamines. A person using Ecstasy could experience increased heart rate and blood pressure, muscle tension, involuntary teeth clenching, nausea, blurred vision, faintness, and chills or sweating.

 

Because MDMA isn’t pure you don’t know the interactions with fluvoxamine in your body

 

MDMA is just as likely to be mixed with other substances as any other drug. Supposedly “pure” Molly can contain ephedrine (a stimulant), dextromethorphan (a cough suppressant), ketamine, caffeine, cocaine, methamphetamine, or even bath salts. Just because it comes in crystal or powder form—instead of a pill like Ecstasy—doesn’t prove that it’s pure. WIth this being the case, there’s no way to accurately predict the effect of mixing fluvoxamine and MDMA in your body. Indeed, the chemical reactions of MDMA nad fluvoxamine in your body could be totally different to someone else taking the exact same amount of fluvoxamine and MDMA because of individual physiology.

 

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), a substantial percentage of Molly or Ecstasy contain some level of adulterants in them. So then it’s not just looking at the effects of mixing fluvoxamine and Molly. It’s about mixing MDMA and fluvoxamine and whatever else gets used as a cutting agent.

 

Common things used to cut MDMA

 

  •  Paramethoxyamphetamine (PMA) or MDEA
  •  Aspirin
  •  Caffeine
  •  Methamphetamine or amphetamine
  •  Cocaine
  •  Bath salts, including drugs like mephedrone
  •  Butylone
  •  Ketamine
  •  LSD

 

Worryingly, the DEA have also reported that “more than 80 different unique substances have been marketed as MDMA. Many drugs sold as Molly or ecstasy contain no MDMA at all.” Which is a worry, anyway you choose to look at it.

 

fluvoxamine and MDMA and Fentanyl

 

What the above list of cutting agents doesn’t reveal is probably the most harrowing thing to emerge over the past few years. Being the widespread and unreserved use of Fentanyl as a cutting agent for MDMA and other drugs. Now, MDMA is used recreationally by many people. It’s illegal. And most people are informed enough to balance the risk (both of prosecution and to health) of taking MDMA, and mixing MDMA with fluvoxamine.

 

What most people don’t bargain on is getting a massive, deadly dose of Fentanly thinking it’s MDMA. Totally wrong. Unacceptable behavior in the eyes of many, yet seemingly acceptable practice by those involved in the sale and production of MDMA. When we throw Fentanl into the mix with MDMA and then {Fuldrug} the chances of a massive Myocardial infarction… AKA heart attack. And usually death.

 

Isn’t MDMA Safe? Then surely fluvoxamine and MDMA safe too?

 

No drug is ‘safe’. That’s the nature of drugs! If they can be avoided 100% then great. If not. Make yourself aware of all the facts and interactions between drugs. When it comes to MDMA there has been a fair bit of news recently regarding clinical trials in a medically supervised environment. Psilocybin and MDMA are two of the promising psychedelic medications for mental illness treatment. A recent phase 3 trial of MDMA and talk therapy for individuals suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder offered positive results. However, these are limited medical trials. They are in no way advocating the use of MDMA or of mixing fluvoxamine and MDMA.

 

Mixing drugs is not something to take lightly, if you are taking fluvoxamine and are also consuming alcohol or weed, you can research the effects here.  The effects of fluvoxamine and Weed or the effects of fluvoxamine and Alcohol or fluvoxamine and Cocaine.

fluvoxamine vs MDMA

Fluvoxamine, sold under the brand name Luvox among others, is an antidepressant of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) class. It is primarily used to treat major depressive disorder and obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD), but is also used to treat anxiety disorders such as panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder.

Fluvoxamine’s side-effect profile is very similar to other SSRIs: constipation, gastrointestinal problems, headache, anxiety, irritation, sexual problems, dry mouth, sleep problems and a risk of suicide at the start of treatment by lifting the psychomotor inhibition, but these effects appear to be significantly weaker than with other SSRIs (except gastrointestinal side-effects). The tolerance profile is superior in some respects to other SSRIs, particularly with respect to cardiovascular complications, despite its age.

It is on the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines.

 

MDMA vs fluvoxamine

3,4-Methyl​enedioxy​methamphetamine (MDMA), commonly seen in tablet form (ecstasy) and crystal form (molly or mandy), is a potent central nervous system (CNS) stimulant primarily used for recreational purposes. The desired effects include altered sensations, increased energy, empathy, and pleasure. When taken by mouth, effects begin in 30 to 45 minutes and last 3 to 6 hours.

MDMA was first developed in 1912 by Merck. It was used to enhance psychotherapy beginning in the 1970s and became popular as a street drug in the 1980s. MDMA is commonly associated with dance parties, raves, and electronic dance music. It may be mixed with other substances such as ephedrine, amphetamine, and methamphetamine. In 2016, about 21 million people between the ages of 15 and 64 used ecstasy (0.3% of the world population). This was broadly similar to the percentage of people who use cocaine or amphetamines, but lower than for cannabis or opioids. In the United States, as of 2017, about 7% of people have used MDMA at some point in their lives and 0.9% have used it in the last year.

Short-term adverse effects include grinding of the teeth, blurred vision, sweating and a rapid heartbeat, and extended use can also lead to addiction, memory problems, paranoia and difficulty sleeping. Deaths have been reported due to increased body temperature and dehydration. Following use, people often feel depressed and tired. MDMA acts primarily by increasing the activity of the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline in parts of the brain. It belongs to the substituted amphetamine classes of drugs and has stimulant and hallucinogenic effects.

MDMA is illegal in most countries and has limited approved
medical uses in a small number of countries. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration is currently evaluating the drug for clinical use. Canada has allowed limited distribution of MDMA and other psychedelics such as psilocybin upon application to and approval by Health Canada.

 

Overdose effects of fluvoxamine and MDMA

 

According to the most recent data, about 119,,000 people are treated for problems related to ecstasy and MDMA in emergency rooms in the United States alone. Furthermore, one study found that in 2019, there were 19,458 deaths from psychostimulants including MDMA.

 

But the answer to the question, “Can you overdose on ecstasy?” is not entirely straightforward. While it is possible to die as a result of ecstasy use, deaths from this drug are not necessarily a direct result of taking too much, but rather due to the side effects. And when mixing fluvoxamine and MDMA these side effects may be enhanced rapidly and exponentially.

 

According to medical experts, direct deaths from MDMA and Ecstasy use are usually down to overheating. The MDMA interferes with the body’s ability to regulate temperature and fluvoxamine interferes with this process even further. When people are then in warm environments or dancing, the risk of overheating is higher. The medical term for this is hyperthermia, and with hyperthermia people are at increased isk of:

 

  • Dehydration
  • Swelling of the brain
  • Muscle breakdown
  • Electrolyte imbalances
  • Organ failure

 

fluvoxamine and MDMA Emergencies

 

Many ecstasy “overdoses” are a direct result of additives in the pills themselves, such as Fentanly that we discussed earlier. When MDMA users arrive at a hospital or rehab center physicians and staff will not immediately know what per cent of the pills they’ve ingested was MDMA as opposed to other additives, or indeed what other substances (legal or illegal) have been ingested i.e. fluvoxamine and MDMA. This requires blood toxicology examinations and while the results are being waited on, medical professionals will do their best to treat dehydration and overheating1https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3931692/.

 

Once a patient is stabilized, there is a good chance of a full recovery. That being said, some cases of ecstasy overdose can be fatal, especially when Fentanyl and other highly dangerous cutting agents have been used.

 

If you have been using MDMA and ecstasy and find that it is difficult to stop, it is likely time to reach out for assistance. Don’t risk an overdose emergency or developing a chronic addiction.

 

If you take fluvoxamine, and also drink Alcohol or MDMA, you can research the effects of fluvoxamine and Alcohol as well as fluvoxamine and weed and fluvoxamine and Cocaine here.

 

To find the effects of other drugs and weed refer to our Weed and Other Drugs Index A to L or our Weed and Other Drugs Index M-Z.

 

Or you could find what you are looking for in our Alcohol and Other Drugs index A to L or Alcohol and Other Drugs index M to Z or our MDMA and Other Drugs Index A to L or MDMA and Other Drugs Index M to Z. or Cocaine and Other Drugs Index A to L  or Cocaine and Other Drugs Index M to Z.

 

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If you are looking stop using either MDMA or fluvoxamine, you may experience withdrawal symptoms.  MDMA withdrawal can be researched here and fluvoxamine withdrawal can be found on our Withdrawal index.

 

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References: fluvoxamine and MDMA

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  4. Vogels N, Brunt TM, Rigter S, van Dijk P, Vervaeke H, Niesink RJ. Content of ecstasy in The Netherlands: 1993–2008. Addiction. 2009;104(12):2057–2066. [PubMed] []
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  6. Parrott AC. Chronic tolerance to recreational MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) or Ecstasy. J Psychopharmacol. 2005;19(1):71–83. [PubMed] []
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  8. Kuypers KP, Wingen M, Ramaekers JG. Memory and mood during the night and in the morning after repeated evening doses of MDMA. J Psychopharmacol. 2008;22(8):895–903. [PubMed] []
  9. Verrico CD, Miller GM, Madras BK. MDMA (Ecstasy) and human dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin transporters: implications for MDMA-induced neurotoxicity and treatment. Psychopharmacology (Berl) 2007;189(4):489–503. [PubMed] []
Mixing MDMA