Anxiety Treatment Centers in Whittier California

Anxiety Treatment

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Author: Matthew Idle   Reviewed: Philippa Gold

 

Disclaimer: We use fact-based content and publish material that is researched, cited, edited, and reviewed by professionals. The information we publish is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or another qualified healthcare provider. In a Medical Emergency contact the Emergency Services Immediately

Access Anxiety Treatment in Whittier California Today

 

Better Help is one of the most well-known online therapy providers in Whittier California. You may have heard of Better Help’s advertisements in Whittier California on podcasts, radio, or read about it online.According to the latest statistics provided by Betterhelp, the online therapy provider has nearly 2 million customers worldwide. Its client-base makes Better Help the world’s largest online therapy provider and a very popular choice for those in the Whittier California area.

 

Better Help ticks a lot of boxes for individuals seeking anxiety treatment in Whittier California. The platform allows users to connect with therapists that can help with a variety of mental health concerns including depression, stress and anxiety. Additionally, Betterhelp provides classes and seminars along with regular one-to-one therapy sessions. These sessions aim to help clients in Whittier California with issues and delve even deeper into mental health wellness.

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Anxiety Disorder Treatment in Whittier California

It is completely normal to feel anxious or to experience anxiety as a way for your brain to react to stress. Anxiety alerts you of a possible danger, and is okay to feel. However, anxiety disorders are much different to feeling the occasional bout of anxiety. Anxiety disorders can be debilitating and leave a person feeling unable to cope with life. Recent studies suggest that at least 19.8% of the Whittier California population suffer from crippling bouts of anxiety that impact their lives.

 

Anxiety Treatment Centers in Whittier California allows you to live, learn, and understand your anxiety disorder. Often clients who attend anxiety treatment centers in Whittier California experience significant and rapid reduction in anxiety and in many cases complete remission from a debilitating condition.

 

Because anxiety clinics in Whittier California are a relatively new concept some individuals and families travel a little further afield, often interstate to find the best anxiety treatment centers.

 

What are anxiety disorders in Whittier California?

 

19.8% of adults in Whittier California and the United States in general suffer from Anxiety disorders that cause consistent overwhelming anxiety and fear. The excessive anxiety may make a person avoid school, work, family, friends and social situations. Anxiety disorder sufferers avoid people and situations as they may trigger symptoms. Anxiety disorders can also be caused by an underlying health issue. The constant thinking and worrying about an ailment can lead you to anxiety, and the symptoms of anxiety disorder are often the first indicators of a medical illness.

 

Symptoms of anxiety disorder

 

Anxiety disorders’ main symptoms are worry and fear. Clients at Anxiety Treatment Centers in Whittier California report that the most common symptoms are:

 

  • Panic
  • Fear
  • Feeling danger is occurring or about to occur
  • Insomnia
  • Inability to stay calm
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Hyperventilation
  • Heart palpitations
  • Dry mouth
  • Nausea

 

Anxiety disorder treatment in Whittier California

 

There are several treatments for anxiety disorders in Whittier California, but residential Anxiety Treatment Centers in Whittier California offer the best, and most lasting treatment solution. Residential anxiety treatment centers in Whittier California are uniquely tailored to each individual and their own issues. Treatment at a Whittier California anxiety clinic may use psychotherapy, holistic treatments, Biochemical restoration and cognitive behavioral therapy sessions.

 

Types of anxiety disorders treated at centers in Whittier California

 

There are multiple types of anxiety disorders treated at residential anxiety rehabs in Whittier California and each has its own symptoms and signs.

 

Anxiety disorders treatment centers in Whittier California or nearby that treat:

 

Anxiety and How it is Treated

 

Anxiety is a normal human response to stress. It’s natural to feel nervous when faced with a stressful situation, such as a job interview, an important presentation, or moving to another country. Although this type of anxiety can be unpleasant, it usually does not have a debilitating effect on a person’s life. Anxiety disorders are a category of mental health conditions characterized by intense feelings of anxiety, fear, or worry that can persist for a long period of time.

How does Anxiety affect a person?

 

Without proper treatment, anxiety disorders can have a significant impact on a person’s mood, attitude, and behavior, and can interfere with daily life. Anxiety is one of the most common mental health problems in Whittier California and indeed, the world, affecting approximately 264 million people worldwide. It can affect anyone at any age, although women are more likely than men to be diagnosed with anxiety disorders. Everyone experiences anxiety and anxiety-related symptoms from time to time. It’s natural to feel nervous in certain situations, such as before an important exam or job interview.

 

At what point does anxiety become a problem?

 

However, when the anxiety you experience is persistent, debilitating, and disproportionate to your situation, you may have an anxiety disorder.

 

Anxiety disorders are divided into : generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, agoraphobia and other phobias, separation anxiety disorder and panic disorder. When you have anxiety disorders, you can also experience many physical symptoms, such as abdominal pain and excessive sweating. You may feel a growing sense of doom or panic. If you do have an anxiety disorder, the symptoms can cause significant discomfort that spirals out of control and persists for months, making it difficult or impossible to perform normal daily functions.

What is inpatient anxiety treatment?

 

Inpatient anxiety treatment in Whittier California is considered the most effective form of therapy. Residential Anxiety Treatment Centers provide a calm, structured environment where you can fully focus your energy on your recovery process without distractions or demanding the outside world. Residential anxiety treatment is especially effective for people with comorbid disorders because it isolates them from external triggers leading to substance abuse and reduces the risk of relapse.

 

Your physical environment can have a major impact on your recovery. Inpatient anxiety treatment provides a safe and supportive environment for people trying to manage symptoms and complications on their own or through outpatient treatment. These facilities offer therapy, health care, overall wellness, coping strategies, relationship therapy, and other treatments delivered by dedicated specialists. When anxiety is overwhelmed and other efforts fail, it may be time for hospitalization. If you are struggling with anxiety, it may be time to choose inpatient care for your care.

 

Benefits of Going to an Anxiety Treatment Center in Whittier California

 

Going to an anxiety treatment center in Whittier California can be helpful for individuals struggling with anxiety. Here are some benefits of going to an anxiety treatment center:

 

Professional help

 

Anxiety treatment centers are staffed by professionals who are trained and experienced in treating anxiety disorders. They will be able to provide a comprehensive assessment, diagnosis and treatment plan that is tailored to the individual’s specific needs.

 

Cognitive behavioral therapy is a common type of therapy in Whittier California. It teaches clients how to turn negative or panic-creating thoughts into positive thoughts. Clients are taught ways to approach and manage their fear without anxiety.

 

Talk therapy in Whittier California helps individuals undergoing detox in a variety of ways:

 

  • provides emotional support
  • helps individuals develop coping skills to deal with cravings and triggers
  • address underlying mental health conditions
  • provide education on the detox process and the importance of ongoing recovery.
  • help individuals identify and address any underlying traumas or stressors that may have contributed to their substance abuse
  • develop healthier ways of coping with mental health issues

 

Evidence based treatment

 

Anxiety treatment centers in Whittier California offer evidence based treatments such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and exposure therapy, which are proven to be effective in treating anxiety disorders.

 

Supportive environment

 

Anxiety treatment centers provide a supportive environment where individuals can feel safe and understood. They can also help individuals to connect with others who are going through similar experiences, which can be very beneficial.

 

Intensive treatment

 

Anxiety treatment centers in Whittier California typically offer intensive treatment programs, which can include individual therapy, group therapy, and other therapeutic activities. This can be especially beneficial for individuals who need a more intensive level of care.

 

Medications

 

Anxiety treatment centers may also provide medication management for individuals who need it.

 

Traveling to Whittier California for Anxiety Help

 

Most individuals going to an Anxiety Treatment Center in Whittier California live relatively locally. However, some clients need to travel internationally to receive treatment in Whittier California. For these individuals it is very important to get the right Visa and to check the Whittier California Immigration rules. Below are some helpful links to help you check Whittier California Immigration and Visas:

 

Lets Go Global

Migration Made Simple

Australia Made Simple

Canada Visas

 

What is outpatient anxiety treatment?

 

However, a quality outpatient program that is delivered online can be highly beneficial for an individual suffering from anxiety.  Accessing the highest quality professionals from the comfort of your own home, in familiar surroundings and on your own schedule can indeed limit the extra anxiety felt when seeking treatment.  Remedy Wellbeing offer the world’s most popular online therapeutic experience for a complete Anxiety treatment program.   REMEDY is best known as the treatment center of choice for celebrities, sports stars and royalty.  They are well known for being the most expensive rehab in the world, treating the rich and famous for burnout, depression, anxiety, addictions and stress management.  Remedy has taken their program and developed an affordable online program for people suffering anxiety to access wherever they are in the world and at whatever stage of anxiety they are currently experiencing.  Remedy Wellbeing is the world’s leading anxiety treatment program.

 

Understanding Online Therapy For Anxiety

 

Online anxiety treatment in Whittier California may be an option for you if you are looking for a convenient, low-cost mental health treatment option. There are many reasons why you may be interested in online therapy, from not having access to a traditional treatment facility locally in Whittier California, to having trouble leaving the house because of your anxiety. Whatever your reasons for choosing, it is useful to know more about online anxiety therapy before diving headfirst into your first person therapy session. First, it helps to understand the types of therapies you can expect to receive with online therapists for anxiety.

 

Some therapists in Whittier California stick with a single treatment method, whereas others may mix or combine different therapeutic approaches depending on your particular needs or issues. Some forms of therapy that may be offered include Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Online Psychotherapy, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), and Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT). These forms of therapy help you to control your anxious thoughts, to slowly address difficult situations so they eventually do not trigger so much anxiety, and learn to cope with and tolerate the condition. For more information about Online Therapy for Anxiety Press Here.

When should I seek Anxiety Treatment?

 

These mental illnesses can become debilitating and interfere with your ability to function normally, let alone enjoy life. There is hope, however, as anxiety disorders are one of the most treatable types of mental illness. There are many good reasons to seek treatment of any kind, but if anxiety can overwhelm you and cause serious problems in your life, consider intensive treatment offered in a residential facility. This supportive therapy can give you a solid foundation and give you the tools you need to get home and manage your anxiety.

 

Types of Anxiety Disorders

 

Below are some of the most common anxiety disorders we treat in rehab.

 

Generalized Anxiety Disorder

 

The most common type of anxiety disorder is generalized anxiety disorder, which is characterized by chronic feelings of fear and worry about unspecific events.

 

Panic Disorder

 

People with panic disorder experience sudden outbursts of intense fear. Although panic attacks usually occur after a long period of stress, they can also occur without triggers.

 

Agoraphobia

 

Agoraphobia is an often misunderstood disorder characterized by a fear of situations where it is difficult to escape or get help. Social Anxiety Disorder: Social anxiety disorder is a disorder defined by an extreme fear of being judged or embarrassed in social situations. People with social anxiety disorder may withdraw from others, which can affect relationships, self-confidence, and career. OCD: OCD is a mental disorder that occurs when a person has intrusive thoughts that cause them to engage in repetitive and sometimes destructive behaviors.

 

What is the treatment for anxiety?

 

Also known as speech therapy or psychological counseling, psychotherapy involves working with a therapist to reduce symptoms of anxiety. It can be an effective remedy for anxiety. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is the most effective form of psychotherapy for anxiety disorders. Can anxiety be completely cured with treatment?

Can Anxiety be Cured?

 

Anxiety is incurable, but there are ways to prevent its occurrence. The right anxiety treatment can help calm uncontrolled anxiety so you can move on with your life. A big event or a jumble of smaller, stressful life situations can trigger excessive anxiety, such as a death in the family, stress at work, or constant financial worries. People with certain personality types are more prone to anxiety disorders than others.

Anxiety disorder treatment centers in Whittier California

 

There are several treatments for anxiety disorders, but residential treatment centers in Whittier California are ideal for treating the issues. A residential treatment facility in Whittier California allows you to live, learn, and understand your anxiety disorder.

 

Residential anxiety treatment centers in Whittier California may use psychotherapy and cognitive behavioral therapy sessions. Psychotherapy is a form of counseling. It allows you to learn how your emotions influence your behavior. A mental health specialist trained in psychotherapy will listen to you during sessions. They will talk to you about feelings and thoughts. After listening to you, the mental health specialist will suggest ways to manage and understand the anxiety disorder.

 

Cognitive behavioral therapy is a common type of psychotherapy in Whittier California. It teaches clients how to turn negative or panic-creating thoughts into positive thoughts. Clients are taught ways to approach and manage their fear without anxiety. There are residential treatment centers in Whittier California listed below that provide family cognitive behavioral therapy sessions.

Is an anxiety treatment center in Whittier California right for you?

Anxiety is one of the most common mental health disorders in Whittier California and affects a large number of the population in different ways. Research has discovered that anxiety disorders appear in a large segment of individuals in Whittier California over the age of 18 and affects 18.1% of the adult population of the United States. That is about 40 million Americans each year that are affected by anxiety disorders.

 

The good news for individuals and their families in Whittier California is that anxiety disorders are highly treatable. However, the problem with treating anxiety disorders in Whittier California is that just 42.1% of people in the US that suffer from the mental health issue receive adequate treatment.

 

Most people in Whittier California fail to get help because they do not realize there is something wrong. Others fail to receive treatment due to the stigma that most inpatient treatment centers possess. The reputation of an inpatient anxiety treatment center in Whittier California can alter the way an individual seeks help and prevent them from ultimately recovering.

 

The answer to gaining first-class treatment in a safe environment is attending a luxury anxiety retreat in Whittier California that puts the client at the forefront of its work 24-hours a day. An anxiety retreat in Whittier California has the ability to house, treat, and provide long-term healing that teaches a client how to manage their anxiety disorder in the future.

 

It is very common for a person suffering with anxiety disorder in Whittier California to also have depression or vice versa. The two mental health disorders can come hand in hand. Fifty-percent of all people diagnosed with anxiety disorder in Whittier California also have depression. An anxiety treatment center in Whittier California can treat both disorders and put a client onto the road to full recovery.

Find an Anxiety Therapist in Whittier California

Business Name Rating Categories Phone Number Address
Adriana Anaya Psy.DAdriana Anaya Psy.D
1 review
Counseling & Mental Health +15622046441 1313033 Penn St, Ste 800, Whittier, CA 90602
Cristina Cano, LMFT – Haven Counseling ServicesCristina Cano, LMFT - Haven Counseling Services
2 reviews
Counseling & Mental Health +15622046202 6737 Bright Ave, Whittier, CA 90601
Peter Robbins, PHDPeter Robbins, PHD
72 reviews
Psychologists +18009986329 1370 N Brea Blvd, Turning Point Counseling, Fullerton, CA 92835
Jacqueline WoodsJacqueline Woods
53 reviews
Counseling & Mental Health +16268084030 1949 Huntington Dr, Unit A, Pacific Trauma Treatment Center, South Pasadena, CA 91030
Dr. Kate Truitt & AssociatesDr. Kate Truitt & Associates
34 reviews
Counseling & Mental Health, Health Coach +16265245525 527 S Lake Ave, Pasadena, CA 91101
Erika Llamas LMFTErika Llamas LMFT
3 reviews
Counseling & Mental Health +12137133766 14241 E Firestone Blvd, Ste 400, La Mirada, CA 90638
Gabriel Alaniz, LMFTGabriel Alaniz, LMFT
16 reviews
Counseling & Mental Health +16262220219 158 North Glendora Ave, Ste H, Glendora, CA 91741
Nancy Aliff, Ed.S., M.A., Licensed Educational PsychologistNancy Aliff, Ed.S., M.A., Licensed Educational Psychologist
10 reviews
Educational Services, Special Education, Psychologists +17147945461 7008 Bright Ave, Whittier, CA 90602
Christina Galvez Ph.DChristina Galvez Ph.D
86 reviews
Reiki, Life Coach, Counseling & Mental Health +12133043941 1151 S Robertson Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90035
Amie Lowery Luyties, MFTAmie Lowery Luyties, MFT
36 reviews
Counseling & Mental Health +15623109741 600 East Ocean Blvd, Long Beach, CA 90802
Ariel Black, MS, LMFTAriel Black, MS, LMFT
27 reviews
Counseling & Mental Health +15625819344 4195 N Viking Way, Ste 220, Long Beach, CA 90808
Self Help Los AngelesSelf Help Los Angeles
138 reviews
Counseling & Mental Health, Life Coach, Hypnosis/Hypnotherapy +15625671930 8531 Florence Ave, Ste 200, Downey, CA 90240
Heal From the Ground UpHeal From the Ground Up
118 reviews
Life Coach, Counseling & Mental Health, Career Counseling +17142153160 18702 Colima Rd, Ste 103, Rowland Heights, CA 91748
Nicole Abadi, MFTNicole Abadi, MFT
69 reviews
Counseling & Mental Health +18184773641 6475 E Pacific Coast Hwy, Ste 1027, Long Beach, CA 90803
Michelle Shahbazyan, MS, MAMichelle Shahbazyan, MS, MA
59 reviews
Counseling & Mental Health, Life Coach +18186416127 9375 E Shea Blvd, Scottsdale, AZ 85260
Diamond Bar Psychological & Family ServicesDiamond Bar Psychological & Family Services
1 review
Psychologists +19093966888 21660 Copley Dr, Ste 210, Diamond Bar, CA 91765
Hillary Foster, MFTHillary Foster, MFT
11 reviews
Counseling & Mental Health +19495005464 4132 Katella Ave, Ste 101 A, Los Alamitos, CA 90720
Soul Purpose Therapy: Erin Sumner, LMFTSoul Purpose Therapy: Erin Sumner, LMFT
17 reviews
Counseling & Mental Health +15623045667 2599 E 28th St, Ste 206, Signal Hill, CA 90755

 

Whittier is a city in Southern California in Los Angeles County, part of the Gateway Cities. The 14.7-square-mile (38.0 km) city had 87,306 residents as of the 2020 United States census, an increase of 1,975 from the 2010 census figure. Whittier was incorporated in February 1898 and became a charter city in 1955. The city is named for the Quaker poet John Greenleaf Whittier and is home to Whittier College.

In the founding days of Whittier, when it was a small isolated town, Jonathan Bailey and his wife, Rebecca, were among the first residents. They followed the Quaker religious faith and practice, and held religious meetings on their porch. Other early settlers, such as Aquila Pickering, espoused the Quaker faith. As the city grew, the citizens named it after John Greenleaf Whittier, a respected Quaker poet, and deeded a lot to him. Whittier wrote a dedication poem, and is honored today with statues and a small exhibit at the Whittier museum; a statue of him sits in Whittier’s Central Park, and another representing his poem “The Barefoot Boy” used to reside by the City Hall and is now in front of the main library. Whittier never set foot there, but the city still bears his name and is rooted in the Quaker tradition.

The Gabrielino first inhabited the area.

Whittier’s roots can be traced to Spanish soldier Manuel Nieto. In 1784, Nieto received a Spanish land grant of 300,000 acres (1,200 km2), Rancho Los Nietos, as a reward for his military service and to encourage settlement in California. The area of Nieto’s land grant was reduced in 1790 as the result of a dispute with Mission San Gabriel. Nonetheless, Nieto still had claim to 167,000 acres (680 km2) stretching from the hills north of Whittier, Fullerton, and Brea, south to the Pacific Ocean, and from what is known today as the Los Angeles River east to the Santa Ana River. Nieto built a rancho for his family near Whittier, and purchased cattle and horses for his ranch and also planted cornfields. When Nieto died in 1804, his children inherited their father’s property.

At the time of the 1840s Mexican–American War, much of the land that would become Whittier was owned by Pio Pico, a rancher and the last Mexican governor of Alta California. Pio Pico built a hacienda here on the San Gabriel River, known today as Pio Pico State Historic Park. Following the Mexican–American War, German immigrant Jacob F. Gerkens paid $234 to the U.S. government to acquire 160 acres (0.6 km) of land under the Homestead Act and built the cabin known today as the Jonathan Bailey House. Gerkens would later become the first chief of police of the Los Angeles Police Department. Gerkens’ land was owned by several others before a group of Quakers purchased it and expanded it to 1,259 acres (5 km), with the intent of founding a Quaker community. The area soon became known as a thriving citrus ranching region, with “Quaker Brand” fruit being shipped all over the United States. Beginning in 1887, walnut trees were planted, and Whittier became the largest walnut grower in the United States. In addition to walnuts and citrus, Whittier was also a major producer of pampas grass.

For many years, the sole means of transport from this area to Los Angeles was on foot, or via horse and wagon over rough dirt roads, impeding settlement, development, and the export of agriculture. Thus in 1887 “enterprising and aggressive businessmen” contracted with the Southern Pacific Railroad to build the first railroad spur to Whittier, including a depot. The businessmen covered the $43,000 construction cost for the six-mile spur, which branched off from the Southern Pacific mainline at a junction near what is now Studebaker Road between Firestone Boulevard and Imperial Highway. By 1906, 650 carloads of oranges and 250 carloads of lemons were shipped annually by rail. In 1904, the Pacific Electric opened the trolley line known as “Big Red Cars” from Los Angeles to Whittier. In the first two decades, over a million passengers a year rode to and from Los Angeles on the Whittier Line. After World War II, Whittier grew rapidly and the sub-dividing of orange groves began, driven by housing shortages in southern California. In 1955, the new Civic Center complex was completed and the City Council met in new chambers for the first time on March 8, 1955. The city continued to grow as the City annexed portions of Whittier Boulevard and East Whittier. The 1961 annexation added over 28,000 people to the population, bringing the total to about 67,000.

The first Quaker meetings were held on the front porch of the Jonathan Bailey House. Eventually, as more Quakers arrived, the need for an actual Meeting House arose and the first Quaker meeting house was built on the corner of Comstock Avenue and Wardman Street in 1887. The meeting soon outgrew this 100-seat meeting house and a new larger building was erected on the corner of Philadelphia Street and Washington Avenue in 1902. By 1912, membership had grown to 1,200 and a third building was dedicated on the same site in 1917. With a capacity of 1,700, the 1917 meeting house featured a balcony and was constructed of brick with mahogany paneling and pews. The present meeting house, dedicated in 1975, features many architectural elements and materials from the 1917 building including the stained glass windows and mahogany interior. The Quakers also founded Whittier Academy (later Whittier College), and additional meetings met in East Whittier and at Whittier College’s Mendenhall. Both the Mendenhall meeting and the East Whittier meeting kept the silent meeting longer than the main church.

In 1887 the Pickering Land and Water Company set aside a 20-acre (81,000 m) parcel of land for the development of a college, but a collapse in the land boom stalled construction. Progress on developing a college was sporadic, but on July 30, 1896, the Whittier Academy, operating since 1891, officially changed its name to Whittier College with 100 students enrolled. The school mascot is “The Poet.” By 1906, Whittier College was an educational institution with laboratories, boarding halls, a large gymnasium and athletic fields. Due to an economic depression in the 1890s, the first bachelor’s degrees were not awarded at the college for 17 years.

The Mendenhall Building at Whittier College was donated by Leona May Mendenhall in honor of her husband Oscar. The Mendenhalls were among the founding families of Whittier. Oscar’s brother, Samuel Mendenhall, helped bring in the water system and post office. The Mendenhalls were large growers for Sunkist oranges and Blue Diamond walnuts.

Whittier was the first home to Azusa Pacific University, established on March 3, 1899, by the Quaker community and a Methodist evangelist under the name Training School for Christian Workers.

On October 1, 1987, at 7:42 a.m., the Whittier Narrows earthquake struck, the epicenter being six miles (10 km) north by northwest of Whittier. The seismic event, which registered 5.9 on the moment magnitude scale, killed eight people and damaged many of uptown Whittier’s historic buildings. Three days later, on October 4, 1987, at 3:59 a.m., a major aftershock measuring 5.2 caused further damage. Buildings and residential structures which were already borderline unsafe were now deemed unsafe or uninhabitable. In the years following the earthquake, the city’s deteriorating uptown business district became the focus of renewed development, which met with opposition from many Whittier citizens. The Whittier Conservancy was formed in 1987 in an effort to stop the demolition of many historic buildings and residences after the disaster. The city also created a Historic Resources Commission to oversee the approval of historic designations, historic districts and Mills Act proposals. The Whittier Narrows earthquake also destroyed The Quad at Whittier, a shopping mall which had to be rebuilt.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 14.7 square miles (38 km), virtually all land.

Whittier is bordered by the community of Hacienda Heights to the northeast, City of Industry to the north, and several other unincorporated communities in the San Gabriel Valley mostly along its northern sections. Pico Rivera lies at the west, La Habra Heights to the east, La Habra to the southeast and Santa Fe Springs to the south.

There are several neighborhoods in Whittier. The area centered around Philadelphia Street and Greenleaf Avenue is known as Uptown Whittier and contains the traditional central business core. Just north of Uptown Whittier are the neighborhoods known as Central Park and Hadley-Greenleaf. They have been designated historic districts by the city Historic Resources Commission, and together comprise most of the area of the Whittier Historic Neighborhood Association. These districts contain many Craftsman and Spanish Colonial Revival homes. In and abutting the hills north of the historic districts is Starlite Estates. The area surrounding Whittier College is known as College Hills and was also recently designated a historic district, as has a small cluster of homes along Earlham Drive. The area east of College Avenue is referred to as East Whittier. East Whittier was a separate agricultural community until the postwar era. The eastern parts of East Whittier, developed in the 1950s and 1960s, are known as Friendly Hills, which was developed at the same time as Murphy Ranch and Leffingwell Ranch.

Whittier is about 15 miles (24 km) inland of the Pacific Ocean, resulting in higher daytime temperatures, and since it lies at a higher elevation than the cities further west, cold air drains into the lower elevation of the Los Angeles Basin which results in warmer night-time lows, producing an example of thermal inversion. Winter daytime highs typically range from 68 °F to 80 °F (20 °C to 27 °C) with overnight lows dropping to about 43 °F to 54 °F (6° to 12 °C). In the summer highs range from 78 °F to 95 °F (26 °C to 35 °C) and corresponding overnight lows in the 58 °F to 72 °F (14 °C to 22 °C). Rainfall follows a Mediterranean pattern with most rain falling during the winter months, while summers tend to be rather dry. The mean annual rainfall is about 14 inches (360 mm).

The 2020 United States census reported that Whittier had a total population of 87,306 people with a density of 5,824.9 people per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 48.7% White (24.5% Non-Hispanic white, 24.2% White Hispanic), 1.5% African American, 1.1% Native American, 5.3% Asian, 0.0% Asian Pacific American, and 8.4% from two or more races. Hispanic and Latino Americans were 65.8% of the population. 16.6% of the population were foreign born, and 3.1% of people were veterans.

There were 27,093 households, of which the average size was 3.07 persons. The median household income during 2016–2020 was $76,026, and 9.5% of the population was living in poverty.

The population was spread out, with 23.0% of the population under the age of 18 and 15.1% above the age of 65. Of all people aged above 25 years, 88.5% were high school graduates, and 26.7% had a bachelor’s degree or higher. 61.5% of people aged above 16 years were in the civilian labor force.

The 2010 United States Census reported that Whittier had a population of 85,331. The population density was 5,818.6 inhabitants per square mile (2,246.6/km2). The racial makeup of Whittier was 55,117 (64.6%) White (28.3% Non-Hispanic White, 36.3% White Hispanic), 1,092 (1.3%) African American, 1,093 (1.3%) Native American, 3,262 (3.8%) Asian, 123 (0.1%) Pacific Islander, 20,848 (24.4%) from other races, and 3,796 (4.4%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 56,081 persons (65.7%).

The Census reported that 83,696 people (98.1% of the population) lived in households, 1,083 (1.3%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 552 (0.6%) were institutionalized.

There were 28,273 households, out of which 11,289 (39.9%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 14,152 (50.1%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 4,566 (16.1%) had a female householder with no husband present, 1,896 (6.7%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 1,770 (6.3%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 247 (0.9%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 6,096 households (21.6%) were made up of individuals, and 2,495 (8.8%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.96. There were 20,614 families (72.9% of all households); the average family size was 3.46.

The population was spread out, with 21,686 people (25.4%) under the age of 18, 9,198 people (10.8%) aged 18 to 24, 23,627 people (27.7%) aged 25 to 44, 20,819 people (24.4%) aged 45 to 64, and 10,001 people (11.7%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35.4 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.5 males.

There were 29,591 housing units at an average density of 2,017.8 per square mile (779.1/km), of which 16,207 (57.3%) were owner-occupied, and 12,066 (42.7%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 1.3%; the rental vacancy rate was 5.1%. 49,393 people (57.9% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 34,303 people (40.2%) lived in rental housing units.

During 2009–2013, Whittier had a median household income of $68,522, with 12.4% of the population living below the federal poverty line.

As of the census of 2000, there were 83,680 people, 28,271 households, and 20,468 families residing in the city. The population density was 5,719.4 inhabitants per square mile (2,208.3/km2). There were 28,977 housing units at an average density of 1,980.5 per square mile (764.7/km). The racial makeup of the city was 43.2% White, 1.2% African American, 1.3% Native American, 3.3% Asian, 0.2% Pacific Islander, 25.8% from other races, and 5.0% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 65.9% of the population.

There were 28,271 households, out of which 37.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.5% were married couples living together, 14.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.6% were non-families. 22.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.88 and the average family size was 3.38.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 28.3% under the age of 18, 10.0% from 18 to 24, 30.6% from 25 to 44, 18.6% from 45 to 64, and 12.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $49,256, and the median income for a family was $55,726. Males had a median income of $40,394 versus $34,223 for females. The per capita income for the city was $21,409. About 7.8% of families and 10.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.7% of those under age 18 and 8.0% of those age 65 or over.

Mexican and German were the most common ancestries. Mexico and El Salvador were the most common foreign places of birth.

In 2022, Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority’s Greater Los Angeles Homeless Count counted 127 homeless individuals in Whittier.

Whittier’s Redevelopment Agency has numerous projects underway to revitalize the community. This includes a $7 million project near the historic Hoover Hotel.

The Whittwood Town Center (formerly the Whittwood Mall) anchored by JC Penney, Target, PetSmart, Sears, Vons, and Kohl’s has made way for Red Robin and Chick-fil-A. The city still waits to attract more well known businesses and open new residential town homes with the revival of its Uptown district.

In addition, the agency is working on developing a 480-acre (1.9 km) project area near Whittier Blvd. The master plan was adopted in June 2005 by the City Council. In 2019, Whittier’s first food hall, Poet Gardens, opened in Uptown Whittier.

According to the city’s 2013 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, the top employers in the city are:

On April 17, 1900, the Whittier Public Library Board of Trustees held its first meeting in Landrum Smith’s drugstore. With an initial collection of 60 books and 200 magazines, the library facilities began in the Woody Building as a reading room, maintained by Mr. Hester in exchange for space for his telegraph office. In 1907, a Carnegie grant funded the construction of the building at Bailey and Greenleaf that many Whittierites fondly remember. As the city expanded, a larger library was needed, and the Friends of the Library organized in 1956 to raise money for a new building. Through their efforts, and those of the board members, librarians, and citizen fund raising groups, the new library was completed at the Washington Avenue site in May 1959. In 1968, service was further expanded with the construction of the Whittwood Branch Library on Santa Gertrudes Avenue.

Whittier uses a council–manager form of government. Until 2014, all five city council members were elected at-large with the mayor being elected by the council. Following the 2016 elections, four members of the city council were elected in districts to four-year terms, whereas the mayor is directly elected to two-year terms. The council also appoints a city manager.

The current mayor of Whittier is Joe Vinatieri. The city council is currently made up of Fernando Dutra, Octavio Martinez, Cathy Warner, and mayor pro tempore Jessica Martinez. Brian Saeki is currently serving as the city manager, with Shannon DeLong as the assistant city manager.

In the California State Legislature, Whittier is in the 30th Senate District, represented by Democrat Bob Archuleta, and in the 56th Assembly District, represented by Democrat Lisa Calderon.

In the United States House of Representatives, Whittier is in California’s 38th congressional district, represented by Democrat Linda Sánchez.

The city of Whittier is served by the Whittier Union High School District, East Whittier City School District, Whittier City School District, Lowell Joint School District

Five high schools, California High School, La Serna High School, Pioneer High School, Santa Fe High School, and Whittier High School comprise the Whittier Union High School District. There is one alternative continuation high school Frontier High School and a homeschooling hq, Sierra Vista High School. Although they still have Whittier postal addresses, both California High School and Pioneer High School lie outside the city limits in unincorporated Los Angeles County. Santa Fe High School is located within the City of Santa Fe Springs. Adults may attend the Whittier Adult School, which belongs to the Whittier Union High School District.
The city also has three private Catholic elementary schools, K-8

The schools are operated by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles with one (St. Mary of the Assumption School) being one of the largest Catholic elementary schools in Los Angeles County. St Gregory The Great School has been Number One in their deanery for the Academic Decathlon two years in a row.

Whittier Friends School is a member of the Friends Council on Education and associated with First Friends Church of Whittier, the founding Quaker meeting of Whittier. Whittier Friends School includes a licensed preschool and an elementary school (TK-6th grade).

Trinity Lutheran School, a ministry of Trinity Lutheran Church, serves kindergarten through eighth grade.

Whittier Christian School, a ministry of Calvary Baptist Church, Association of Christian Schools International serves the Whittier community. They have an Elementary campus, two Preschool campuses, one Junior High, and one High School.

Plymouth Christian School, a ministry of Plymouth Church, serves preschool through sixth grade.

Higher education institutions in the area include Rio Hondo College, which lies just outside the city, Southern California University of Health Sciences, and historic Whittier College.

The local newspaper is the Whittier Daily News. Other area papers include the San Gabriel Valley Tribune, the parent paper of the Whittier Daily News, the Los Angeles Times and the Orange County Register. Music fanzine Los Angeles Flipside published locally from 1977 to 1990. Former newspaper include: Coast Reporter, Whittier Californian, Whittier Graphic, Whittier Star Reporter, and more.

The Los Angeles County Department of Health Services operates the Whittier Health Center in Whittier.

At one time the California Youth Authority operated the Fred C. Nelles Youth Correctional Facility. The center, which started operations in 1890, closed on May 27, 2004.

There are a variety of bus routes operating within the city with Metro, Foothill Transit, Montebello Bus Lines and the Norwalk Transit being the leading bus lines used within the city. Foothill Transit line 274 originates at Beverly & Norwalk, then proceeds north to Baldwin Park via Workman Mill Road and Puente Avenue. Foothill Transit line 285 travels through Whittier on Whittier Boulevard and Colima Road between La Habra and Hacienda Heights. Montebello Transit Line 10 originates at Whittwood Mall, then proceeds west to Montebello and the Atlantic L Line station via Whittier Boulevard. Montebello 40 originates at Beverly and Norwalk, then proceeds west to Montebello and Downtown Los Angeles via Beverly Boulevard and 4th Street. Montebello 50 travels through Whittier between La Mirada and Downtown Los Angeles. Metro Bus line 121 originates at Whittwood Mall and travels west to the Norwalk C Line station, then to the Aviation C line station via Imperial Hwy. Metro Bus line 270 runs through North, Uptown and West Whittier on its way between Monrovia and the Norwalk Green Line station. The Sunshine Shuttle is a circular serving Whittier and the unincorporated communities of South and West Whittier

The city also has a variety of roads. One freeway, the San Gabriel River Freeway (I-605) runs right along the northern end of the city. State Route 72 runs via Whittier Boulevard and forms part of El Camino Real. Other major streets in Whittier include Beverly Boulevard, Colima Road, Greenleaf Avenue, Lambert Road, Mar Vista Street, Mills Avenue, Norwalk Boulevard, Painter Avenue, Philadelphia Street and Washington Boulevard.

Law enforcement services are provided by the Whittier Police Department.

There are three fire stations within Whittier city limits: Los Angeles County Fire Department Station 28 (Engine, Quint, Paramedic Squad, Mobile Aid, and the Battalion Chief), Station 17 (Engine), Station 59 (Engine and IRT).

The Fred C. Nelles Youth Correctional Facility served as a state reform school for boys and girls until 1916, when the girls were moved elsewhere.
Opened in 1891 before Whittier was incorporated, Nelles was the longest-running state school for juvenile offenders in California and has been declared a California State Historical Landmark. It closed on May 27, 2004, and the facility was used as a television filming site. In 2014, Brookfield Residential Properties announced plans for a large retail, commercial and residential project on the site. Much of Whittier is built out so the 74 acres (30 ha) site brings a unique chance for growth in the city. Although over 50 buildings were demolished, discussions have focused on how many of the eight historic buildings should be preserved. The administration building that was constructed in 1928–29, has its own historical designation. Housing and commercial space are under construction on the site.

Various notable movies and television shows have been filmed in the city including:

Anxiety rehab centers in Whittier California

Ways to avoid anxiety disorders

 

Along with identifying an anxiety disorder and getting professional help in Whittier California, there are other ways to avoid panic and worry-filled situations. Unfortunately, there isn’t a way to predict what will trigger an anxiety disorder. There are ways to reduce the impact of symptoms of anxiety1https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5573566/.

 

  • The most important way to reduce the impact of symptoms is to get help locally in Whittier California as early as possible. If you wait to treat anxiety, it can be harder to get rid of.
  • Be active and participate in activities close to you in Whittier California that you enjoy. These activities will make you feel good about your life and yourself. Participate in social interaction and be around people you enjoy spending time with.
  • Avoid drugs and/or alcohol. Substance use and misuse can make anxiety worse.

References and Citations: Anxiety Treatment Centers in Whittier California

  1. Wittchen HU., Jacobi F., Rehm J., et al The size and burden of mental disorders and other disorders of the brain in Europe 2010. Eur Neuropsychopharmacol. 2011;21(9):655–679. [PubMed] 
  2. Kessler RC., Berglund P., Demler O., Jin R., Merikangas KR., Walters EE. Lifetime prevalence and age-of-onset distributions of DSM-IV disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005;62(6):593–602. [Google Scholar]
  3. Bandelow B., Baldwin D., Abelli M., et al Biological markers for anxiety disorders, OCD and PTSD: a consensus statement. Part II: neurochemistry, neurophysiology and neurocognition. World J Biol Psychiatry. 2017;18(3):162–214. [Google Scholar]